SPEAKERS

Welcome to the Rotary Zone Institute Speaker Page! We are honored to present an exceptional lineup of speakers who bring a wealth of knowledge and diverse experiences from around the world. Our speakers are leaders in their fields, each contributing significantly to their communities and beyond through their dedication to service, peace, and professional excellence.

*PLEASE NOTE: Schedule and speakers are subject to change without notice.

John Hewko | Rotary Club of Kyiv |Ukraine

John Hewko is the general secretary and chief executive officer of Rotary International and The Rotary Foundation.

From 2004 to 2009, Hewko was vice president for operations and compact development for the Millennium Challenge Corporation (MCC), a U.S. government agency established in 2004 to deliver foreign assistance to the world’s poorest countries. At MCC, he was the principal United States negotiator for foreign assistance agreements to 26 countries in Africa, Asia, South America, the Middle East, and the former Soviet Union. During his tenure, he completed the negotiation of assistance agreements totaling $6.3 billion to 18 countries for infrastructure, agriculture, water and sanitation, health, and education projects.

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Prior to joining MCC, Hewko was an international partner with the law firm Baker & McKenzie, specializing in international corporate transactions in emerging markets. He helped establish the firm’s Moscow office and was the managing partner of its offices in Kyiv and Prague.

While working in Ukraine in the early 1990s, Hewko assisted the working group that prepared the initial draft of the new Ukrainian post-Soviet constitution and was a charter member of the first Rotary club in Kyiv.

Hewko has been a public policy scholar at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, an adjunct professor of law at Georgetown University, and a visiting scholar at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace. He has published papers and articles in leading U.S. and international publications, and he has spoken extensively on political and business issues dealing with the former Soviet Union, Central Europe, Africa, and Latin America. He is also a member of the Council of Foreign Relations.

Hewko holds a law degree from Harvard University, a master’s in modern history from Oxford University (where he studied as a Marshall Scholar), and a bachelor’s in government and Soviet studies from Hamilton College in New York.

As general secretary, Hewko leads a diverse staff of 800 at Rotary International’s World Headquarters in Evanston, Illinois, USA, and seven international offices. He and his partner, Marga, are major donors to the Foundation. They live in Evanston.

Michael Collins

Executive Director – Institute for Economics & Peace, The Americas

Michael develops working partnerships with Americas-based governments, civil society organizations, foundations, universities, businesses and think tanks and seeks new opportunities to build IEP’s presence and impact throughout the Americas, with particular focus on expanding the use of IEP’s Positive Peace Framework as a training tool and an evidence-based metric for peace-centered development.

Before joining IEP, Michael oversaw educational, job creation and economic development programs in emerging nations recovering from natural disasters, working frequently with communities affected by poverty and gang violence. Prior to pursuing a career in the non-profit sector, Michael studied electro-mechanical engineering and worked in the construction industry.

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The Institute for Economics and Peace aims to create a paradigm shift in the way the world thinks about peace. We do this by developing global and national indices, calculating the economic cost of violence, analysing country level risk and fragility, and understanding Positive Peace.

Our research is used extensively by governments, academic institutions, think tanks, non‑governmental organisations and by intergovernmental institutions such as the OECD, The Commonwealth Secretariat, the World Bank and the United Nations. The Institute is headquartered in Sydney with offices in 6 countries, and our research achieves over 20 billion media impressions across 150 countries each year.

Founded by IT entrepreneur and philanthropist Steve Killelea (see full bio) in 2007, the Institute for Economics and Peace has had a profound impact on traditional thinking on matters of security, defence, terrorism and development over the last 13 years.

Malaria Program of Impact Partners

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Bill Feldt

Bill Feldt’s 30+ years as a Rotarian, the last 19 as a member of the Rotary Club of Federal Way, Washington, has enabled him to focus on his passion for international service. He is a founding member of Malaria Partners International. Bill has driven Rotary Global Grants, for clean water and sanitation and/or malaria prevention, in Namibia, Ghana, Nicaragua, Bolivia and several in Zambia.

In 2020, Bill led his Rotary club in receiving Rotary International’s first Programs of Scale Grant, Partners for a Malaria-Free Zambia, which begins implementation in 2021 and will be completed in June 2024. Bill and his wife, Rotarian Karen Feldt, enjoy great friendships with Rotarians from around the world and work with many Zambian Rotarian friends to eliminate malaria.

Philip Welkhoff

Philip Welkhoff has led the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation’s Malaria program since 2018 and has concurrently led the Institute for Disease Modeling (IDM) since 2021.

Before becoming director of the Malaria program, Philip served as director of research at IDM before it became part of the foundation. In that role, he helped develop computer simulations of the transmission dynamics of malaria, polio, and other diseases. This work supported public health professionals and scientists in planning eradication strategies. Philip also served as a pro bono external advisor to various Gates Foundation programs, including Agricultural Development and Water, Sanitation & Hygiene.

Philip earned dual undergraduate degrees in mathematics and aerospace engineering at the University of Texas at Austin and holds a Ph.D. in applied and computational mathematics from Princeton University. His doctoral work focused on biophysically inspired models of neural circuits for perceptual decision-making.

Jenny Andrews

A Rotarian for 28 years, Jenny Andrews serves as the Executive Director of Malaria Partners International. Jenny developed her passion for international service during her first trip to Ethiopia on a polio NID in 2005. Upon her return, after 11 years co-leading a venture-backed healthcare software company that was an early leader in patient engagement, Jenny and her partner sold the company and Jenny switched gears, becoming the Director of Global Engagement & Philanthropic Partnerships at PATH, an international, nonprofit global health organization. In that role, Jenny worked with the CEO, Chief Philanthropy Officer and the board of directors to expand support for PATH’s work from corporations, foundations, governments, and individual philanthropists. Jenny has led a dozen trips around the world so investors can see first-hand the impact of their support.

Within Rotary, Jenny has contributed to numerous Rotary Global Grants focused on malaria, WASH, literacy and providing access to technology in low resource settings. She served as president of the Bellevue Breakfast Rotary Club in 2008-2009 and is currently serving as a mentor for the RISE (Rotarians Inspired to Succeed and Engage) program.
Jenny holds a master’s degree in business administration and a bachelor’s degree in biology.

 

Ann-Britt Åsebol | Rotary Club of Falun Kopparvågen

Ann-Britt has a broad background in education, as teacher, principal and trainer at the Teachers Training Collage. She is the founder and CEO of a senior high school for students between the age of 16 and 19. In her hometown Falun, Sweden she holds a lot of positions in the local community.

Ann-Britt has been a politician for several years as County Councilor of Landstinget Dalarna and as a member of the Swedish Parliament since 2010. She has served in the Committee of Constitution, Committees of Education, or Social Insurances, or Social welfare and of Culture.

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Ann-Britt joined the Rotary club of Falun Kopparvågen, Sweden 27 years ago and was District Governor in 2002-03. She has been a Regional Rotary Membership Coordinator and Regional Rotary Foundation Coordinator for Zone 15. She was a Training Leader during the International Assembly in Anaheim and San Diego, USA for two years and she has also served as Seminar Trainer for the Training Leaders. During the years 2012-2014 she was RI Director where she served as chair of the Executive Committee on the Board. In 2017-18 Ann-Britt was the chair of the Joint Young Leaders and Alumni Engagement Committee.

She was the chair of the organizing committee for The Peace symposium in Hamburg 2019. Since 2018 she is the vice chair of the Rotary Peace centers committee. She is also the vice chair in The International Committee for convention in Taipei 2021.

She has been the Presidents Representative to a numerous district conferences around the world.

She is a Benefactor to the Rotary Foundation, Major Donor and Multiple Paul Harris Fellow and a member of Paul Harris Society. She is a recipient of the Citation for Meritorious Service.

Ann-Britt has two sons and a daughter and five grandchildren. In her spare time Ann-Britt enjoys skiing (both cross-country and down-hill) in the winter and playing golf in the summertime. She is also a long distance of reading books and working in the garden.

Dr. Kent Keith

Kent was born in 1948 in Brooklyn, New York. His father was a Marine Corps officer. Because his father was often transferred to new duty posts, Kent and his sisters Mona and Melanie grew up in Nebraska, California, Virginia, Rhode Island, and finally Hawaii.

Kent went to nine schools in 12 years. “We moved almost every summer,” he said. “It was usually a move from one coast to the other. By the time I was 14, I had crossed the country by car nine times. We took a month and drove the whole way, taking a different route each time. We visited natural wonders and historic places. It was an incredible education. Visiting and living in different parts of the country taught me that we are one nation but we have many subcultures.”

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Kent discovered the joy of reading when he was in first grade, got his first taste of leadership as a student council member in the third grade, and became excited about writing when he was in the fifth grade. He gave his first formal public speech at an Optimist Club in Honolulu when he was 14. Mrs. Tommy Harvey, a volunteer speech coach, brought Kent out of his shell and launched his speaking career. Kent graduated from Roosevelt High School in Hawaii in 1966. He was student body president and president of the Honolulu High School Association, which consisted of the student body presidents of the other Honolulu schools.

While Kent has held many jobs and has been involved in many activities during his career, he has continued to speak, write, and lead. He has presented more than 1,200 speeches, workshops, and conference papers in 13 countries; published newspaper articles, law review articles, poetry, and a dozen short books which have sold more than 250,000 copies worldwide; and served as a leader in public, private, nonprofit, and academic organizations.

Kent grew up listening to Broadway musicals that his parents enjoyed— Oklahoma, Carousel, South Pacific, Finian’s Rainbow, Sound of Music, Wonderful Town, and The King and I . When he was in the sixth grade, Kent’s parents bought a large collection of classical music. “I came home during lunch hour and listened to classical music every day,” Kent recalled. His favorites included Tchaikovsky’s 1812 Overture, Rossini’s William Tell Overture, Rimsky-Korsakov’s Russian Easter Overture, and Dvorak’s New World Symphony.

In the seventh grade, Kent’s father signed him up with the Junior Rifle Club at Camp Pendleton Marine Corps Base. “I wasn’t athletic,” he recalls, “so riflery was perfect. It was the anti-sport sport, because it wasn’t about moving around, it was about staying very still. I was pretty good at staying very still.” He worked his way up through Expert Rifleman and was working on his Distinguished Rifleman medal when his father was transferred. Years later, as a freshman at Harvard, he joined the college’s rifle team. “The rifle range was far from campus, and there were only a few of us guys on the team,” he recalls. “One day it occurred to us that since there were no girls on the team, it wasn’t helping our social life, so we should do something else instead.”

In the seventh grade he took piano lessons as a foundation for taking up the clarinet in the eighth grade. The clarinet became a big part of his life in the ninth grade at Stevenson Intermediate School. His ninth grade band director, Jim Uyeda, was a demanding, inspiring, caring teacher who became a lifelong friend and mentor to Kent. “During my ninth grade year, I played the clarinet about four hours a day,” Kent recalls. “I practiced before school, during school, and after school.” He continued under a different band director in high school, playing clarinet in both the band and the orchestra. He also sang in the Central Union Church Youth Choir. The choir director began to give Kent solos to perform with the choir, including arias from Handel’s Messiah and Mendelssohn’s Elijah. Kent was the only boy to win a gold medal for voice in a statewide music competition in 1966. He sang the aria “Madamina” from Mozart’s Don Giovanni.

At Harvard, Kent earned a B.A. in American Government. He sang for a year in the Harvard University Choir, worked for a year and a half at the Harvard Student Agencies Publishing Division, and spent his last year and a half reading and writing poetry. He traveled around the country giving speeches at high schools and student council conventions, and wrote three booklets for high school student council leaders and advisers. The first booklet, The Silent Revolution: Dynamic Leadership in the Student Council, included the Paradoxical Commandments.

As a Rhodes Scholar at Oxford, Kent earned an M.A. in Philosophy and Politics. In addition to studying, he sang in the Oriel College Evensong choir, and tried rowing in an eight for the first time. “I remember being in a boat race in which there were 110 boats lined up on the river, and my boat was the last one, number 110. We were rated the worst boat on the river, but it was okay— we had a lot of fun.” He also enjoyed dinner-debate meetings of the Oriel Society, during which a frivolous issue was debated after imbibing more than the usual amount of wine.

For example: “Resolved, that Christopher Columbus went too far.” Kent argued that actually, he didn’t go far enough, since he only discovered Hispaniola, not the American mainland.

After two years at Oxford, the Rhodes Trust granted Kent a third year of scholarship support to study in Japan. Kent traveled to Japan by crossing the Soviet Union, touring Moscow and then flying to Irkutsk to board the Trans-Siberian Railway, which he rode for four days to the port of Nakhodka on the Sea of Japan. “The Cold War was still going, so the Soviet Union was a little scary, especially because I was traveling alone,” Kent says. Once in the country, the Soviets kept demanding that he pay additional charges, presumably because they wanted his foreign currency. “I almost didn’t make it across the country,” he recalls. “At the airport in Moscow, I was one ruble short of the baggage fee, and the plane was about to leave without me. A Soviet pilot I had never met before gave me a ruble, and I made the flight. Without his generosity, I might have ended up languishing indefinitely in a jail in Moscow. That kind of thing happened in those days.”

Kent earned a Certificate in Japanese after studying for a year at the Institute of Language Teaching at Waseda University, and then stayed in Japan a second year to study at a Japanese language conversation school. The most important thing that happened was that he met his future wife, Elizabeth Carlson, when he rented an upstairs apartment from her family in 1972. Four years later, Kent and Elizabeth were married in Honolulu. Kent earned his law degree and Elizabeth earned her B.A. in French and Japanese from the University of Hawaii in 1977. During her career, Elizabeth has been an interpreter, translator, foreign correspondent, radio program host, university lecturer, and college Vice-Chancellor. Her Ph.D. is in Japanese Literature. Kent and Elizabeth have three grown children. “Elizabeth is the love of my life,” Kent says. “Being married to her has been a huge blessing.” One of their shared interests is traveling. For example, during the three years they were based in Singapore, Elizabeth made sure that they traveled to a nearby country almost every month. “We enjoyed it immensely,” Kent says.

Looking back, Kent admits that he extended his adolescence as long as possible.  “I was 29 when I finally took my first full-time job,” he notes. During his career, Kent has been an attorney, state government official, high tech park developer, university president (twice), YMCA executive, and CEO of a nonprofit organization (twice). With Elizabeth’s support, he went back to school and earned his doctorate in higher education leadership from the University of Southern California in 1996. “One of my specialties was leading turn-arounds at institutions that were failing but had great missions and values and deserved to survive,” he says. “Our teams succeeded in giving those institutions a new future.” Kent retired from full-time work in 2020. More information about Elizabeth and Kent’s careers is available at http://www.carlsonkeith.com

“When I was in the eighth grade, one of my teachers told us that we students needed to decide what we were going to be when we grew up,” Kent recalls. “I thought that age 13 was a little early to be making a decision like that. However, I had to tell her something, so I told her that I wanted to either be a diplomat in the U.S. Foreign Service or be a Christian minister. I didn’t become either, but I did end up living a total of seven years in foreign countries—England, Japan, and Singapore— and I also ended up as the president of two religious universities, one of which prepared students for the ministry. Perhaps her question wasn’t as premature as I thought at the time.”

Dr. Keith Carlson

I am a Professor of History at the University of Saskatchewan where I hold the Research Chair in Indigenous and Community-Engaged History. I consider myself first and foremost an ethnohistorian. My scholarship is designed and conducted in partnership with communities and aspires to answer questions that are of relevance to those communities. I am interested in both indigenous history and indigenous historical consciousness. What intrigues me most is not the weighing of cultural continuity against colonial-induced change but in assessing the process of change within structures of continuity and the forces of continuity within systems of change. I focus on the history of the Coast Salish of British Columbia but am also building relationships with Aboriginal communities in Washington State and Saskatchewan, and in the past I have worked extensively with Hukbalahap veterans in the Philippines.

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I was born and raised in the coastal industrial town of Powell River, BC, and was the first of my family to attend university. After completing my master’s degree I was employed as historian and research coordinator by the Stó:lõ Nation in the Fraser Valley BC where I worked from 1992 to 2001. While completing my PhD I took up a position in the history department at the University of Saskatchewan. I recently served as the UofS Special Advisor on Outreach and Community-Engagement, and as Director of the university’s Interdisciplinary Centre for Culture and Creativity. I recently established Canada’s first and only Community-Engaged History Collaboratorium where students are provided paid summer internships to work with with Indigenous communities and cultural/heritage organizations conducting original research on projects the communities have identified. I am also the President of the Saskatchewan History & Folklore Society.

When I’m not researching or teaching I can be found spending time with my wife, sons, and friends, whittling, fishing, or strumming on my guitar.

Learn more at https://www.keiththorcarlson.com/

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Scott Martin

Martin is a 2017 Rotary Peace Fellow, mediator and international dialogue trainer with a strong commitment to entrepreneurship and peacebuilding.

Founding Member of Mediators Beyond Borders, former Co-Leader of the Rwanda Team and current Lead Trainer of the PCF Program connecting Rotarians through dialogue.

Locally, Scott teaches Restorative Justice in schools, mediates in the Juvenile Courts, facilitates dialogues with the LAPD, and serves on the NAFCM Board of Directors.

Mario Cesar Martins de Camargo

Mário César Martins de Camargo, a member of the Rotary Club of Santo André, Brazil, has been selected as president of Rotary International for 2025-26. He will be the fourth Brazilian to hold the office and the first since Paulo V.C. Costa in 1990-91.

De Camargo was president of the printing company Gráfica Bandeirantes and has been a consultant to the print industry in Brazil. He has also served as president and chair of several printing and graphics trade associations, including the Brazilian Association of Graphic Technology and the Brazilian Printing Industry Association. He has served on the board of Casa da Esperança (House of Hope), a medical center in Santo André sponsored by his Rotary club that serves more than 200,000 patients every year.

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De Camargo studied in the U.S. and Germany and holds degrees from São Bernardo do Campo Law School and the Getulio Vargas Foundation’s São Paulo School of Business Administration. He attended a high school in Minnesota in 1974-75 through Rotary Youth Exchange, which inspired a lifelong commitment to the program.

A Rotarian since 1980, de Camargo served as his club’s Youth Exchange officer in 1981, at age 24, and its president in 1992-93. He was governor of District 4420 (part of Brazil’s São Paulo state) in 1999-2000, Rotary Foundation trustee in 2015-19, and Rotary International director in 2019-21. He has also served Rotary as an RI learning facilitator, committee member and chair, and task force member. De Camargo and his wife, Denise, also a Rotarian, are Major Donors and Benefactors of The Rotary Foundation.

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Spokane will be full of Big Ideas September 11-14! Rotary Zones 26 & 27 Institute is coming fast on the heels of summer. Register for your all-access pass before the price goes up!

Through July 8th, for just $775 you will enjoy access to everything that Zone Institute has to offer. Reconnect and make new friends at the Welcome Reception, Re-engergize your passion for Rotary in our Peer-to-Peer Sessions, Be inspired by fabulous Keynote Speakers, and Celebrate at the Saturday Evening Gala. These are just a few of the countless opportunities to engage with Rotary friends from throughout Big West Rotary. Price increases to $925 on July 9th.

Learn about additional pricing options and register today at www.zoneinstitute.org/registration/ #RotaryZones2627 #BigWestBigIdeas #BigWestRotary #ZoneInstitute #RotaryInternational #PeopleofAction #Spokane
... See MoreSee Less

Spokane will be full of Big Ideas September 11-14! Rotary Zones 26 & 27 Institute is coming fast on the heels of summer. Register for your all-access pass before the price goes up!

Through July 8th, for just $775 you will enjoy access to everything that Zone Institute has to offer. Reconnect and make new friends at the Welcome Reception, Re-engergize your passion for Rotary in our Peer-to-Peer Sessions, Be inspired by fabulous Keynote Speakers, and Celebrate at the Saturday Evening Gala. These are just a few of the countless opportunities to engage with Rotary friends from throughout Big West Rotary. Price increases to $925 on July 9th.

Learn about additional pricing options and register today at https://www.zoneinstitute.org/registration/  #RotaryZones2627 #BigWestBigIdeas #BigWestRotary #ZoneInstitute #RotaryInternational #PeopleofAction #Spokane

Did you know that Father's Day was founded in Spokane, Washington, at the YMCA in 1910 by Sonora Smart Dodd? Its first celebration was in the Spokane YMCA on June 19, 1910. Dodd’s father, the Civil War veteran William Jackson Smart, was a single parent who raised his six children there. After hearing a sermon on Mother’s Day, the younger Dodd thought it only fair that fathers should have a similar holiday honoring them. Learn more about the history of Father’s Day www.history.com/topics/holidays/fathers-day

Join us in Spokane this September to share more Big Ideas at the Big West Rotary Zone Institute. Register today at zoneinstitute.org/registration. #RotaryZones2627 #BigWestBigIdeas #BigWestRotary #ZoneInstitute #RotaryInternational #PeopleofAction #Spokane
... See MoreSee Less

Did you know that Fathers Day was founded in Spokane, Washington, at the YMCA in 1910 by Sonora Smart Dodd? Its first celebration was in the Spokane YMCA on June 19, 1910. Dodd’s father, the Civil War veteran William Jackson Smart, was a single parent who raised his six children there. After hearing a sermon on Mother’s Day, the younger Dodd thought it only fair that fathers should have a similar holiday honoring them. Learn more about the history of Father’s Day https://www.history.com/topics/holidays/fathers-day

Join us in Spokane this September to share more Big Ideas at the Big West Rotary Zone Institute. Register today at zoneinstitute.org/registration. #RotaryZones2627 #BigWestBigIdeas #BigWestRotary #ZoneInstitute #RotaryInternational #PeopleofAction #Spokane

Founded by James Nettle Glover in 1873, Spokane was a small settlement known as Spokan Falls (the “e” came in 1883). In 1891, “Falls” was dropped and the city became known as Spokane. Learn more about Spokane’s rich history with a self-guided or group walking tour, explore the city’s historic buildings and be sure to take a ride on the 1909 Looff Carousel.

Learn more about Spokane’s history and Indigenous Peoples: ow.ly/pbeO50Sj5p3 #RotaryZones2627

#BigWestBigIdeas #BigWestRotary #ZoneInstitute #RotaryInternational #PeopleofAction #Spokane #IndigenousPeoples
... See MoreSee Less

Founded by James Nettle Glover in 1873, Spokane was a small settlement known as Spokan Falls (the “e” came in 1883). In 1891, “Falls” was dropped and the city became known as Spokane. Learn more about Spokane’s rich history with a self-guided or group walking tour, explore the city’s historic buildings and be sure to take a ride on the 1909 Looff Carousel.

Learn more about Spokane’s history and Indigenous Peoples: https://ow.ly/pbeO50Sj5p3 #RotaryZones2627 

#BigWestBigIdeas #BigWestRotary #ZoneInstitute #RotaryInternational #PeopleofAction #Spokane #IndigenousPeoples

Big Ideas will abound in Spokane when we gather September 11-14 at the Davenport Grand for the Rotary Zones 26 & 27 Institute. Join us as we learn more through Peer-to-Peer Breakout Sessions, House of Friendship Conversations, and presentations from Malaria Partners International & The Gates Foundation, Positive Peace, RI Senior Leadership and more!

Register before July 8th and for $775 per person for a Full Access Pass, you will enjoy:

Admission to all general sessions, where you’ll hear from inspiring and entertaining speakers, including top leaders in our organization.

Informative breakout sessions to help you build your communication, leadership, and project management skills.

Opportunities to network and exchange ideas while browsing the project and vendor booths in the House of Friendship.

All Access Meal Pass, including Wednesday evening Mix & Mingle, two served breakfasts, two served lunches, and Saturday Gala dinner.

Early Bird Pricing ends July 8, 2024. Registrations after July 8 will go up to $925 per person for the Full Access Pass. Register today at d5020.com/ZI24 #RotaryZones2627 #BigWestBigIdeas #BigWestRotary #ZoneInstitute #RotaryInternational #PeopleofAction #Spokane
... See MoreSee Less

Big Ideas will abound in Spokane when we gather September 11-14 at the Davenport Grand for the Rotary Zones 26 & 27 Institute. Join us as we learn more through Peer-to-Peer Breakout Sessions, House of Friendship Conversations, and presentations from Malaria Partners International & The Gates Foundation, Positive Peace, RI Senior Leadership and more!

Register before July 8th and for $775 per person for a Full Access Pass, you will enjoy:

Admission to all general sessions, where you’ll hear from inspiring and entertaining speakers, including top leaders in our organization.

Informative breakout sessions to help you build your communication, leadership, and project management skills.

Opportunities to network and exchange ideas while browsing the project and vendor booths in the House of Friendship.

All Access Meal Pass, including Wednesday evening Mix & Mingle, two served breakfasts, two served lunches, and Saturday Gala dinner.

Early Bird Pricing ends July 8, 2024. Registrations after July 8 will go up to $925 per person for the Full Access Pass. Register today at https://d5020.com/ZI24 #RotaryZones2627 #BigWestBigIdeas #BigWestRotary #ZoneInstitute #RotaryInternational #PeopleofAction #Spokane

Spokane’s name originates from the Spokane Tribe of Indians and means “Children of the Sun.” While the city was originally named Spokane Falls, it was later shortened to Spokane, which comes from the Spokane Tribe of Indians and means “Children of the Sun.” Spokane officially became a city in 1881 when it only had 350 residents and has grown to a population of half a million metropolitan area! Join us in Spokane September 11 - 14 and learn more about the rich, indigenous heritage of the region at our Saturday morning panel discussion. ... See MoreSee Less

Spokane’s name originates from the Spokane Tribe of Indians and means “Children of the Sun.”  While the city was originally named Spokane Falls, it was later shortened to Spokane, which comes from the Spokane Tribe of Indians and means “Children of the Sun.” Spokane officially became a city in 1881 when it only had 350 residents and has grown to a population of half a million metropolitan area! Join us in Spokane September 11 - 14 and learn more about the rich, indigenous heritage of the region at our Saturday morning panel discussion.

Join us on Thursday morning for an early morning art walk. With over 21 sculptures just across the street from the Davenport Grand in Spokane’s Riverfront Park and the surrounding area, you will enjoy a walk full of whimsy and history. #RotaryZones2627 #BigWestBigIdeas #BigWestRotary #ZoneInstitute #RotaryInternational #PeopleofAction #Spokane ... See MoreSee Less

Join us on Thursday morning for an early morning art walk.  With over 21 sculptures just across the street from the Davenport Grand in Spokane’s Riverfront Park and the surrounding area, you will enjoy a walk full of whimsy and history. #RotaryZones2627 #BigWestBigIdeas #BigWestRotary #ZoneInstitute #RotaryInternational #PeopleofAction #Spokane

Send a shoutout to your DGE, share successes from your district or simply promote your business by becoming a sponsor of the 2024 Zones 26 & 27 Zone Institute. As a sponsor, your ad will appear in the zone directory. Ads due by July 31st. #RotaryZones2627 #BigWestBigIdeas #BigWestRotary #ZoneInstitute #RotaryInternational #PeopleofAction #Spokane ... See MoreSee Less

Send a shoutout to your DGE, share successes from your district or simply promote your business by becoming a sponsor of the 2024 Zones 26 & 27 Zone Institute. As a sponsor, your ad will appear in the zone directory. Ads due by July 31st. #RotaryZones2627 #BigWestBigIdeas #BigWestRotary #ZoneInstitute #RotaryInternational #PeopleofAction #Spokane

Summer activities will be here before we know it and Zone Institute will be right on summer’s heels. Don’t miss out on any of the fellowship, fabulous keynotes and fun. Register today at d5020.com/ZI24 Registration prices go up on July 9th. #RotaryZones2627 #BigWestBigIdeas #BigWestRotary #ZoneInstitute #RotaryInternational #PeopleofAction #Spokane ... See MoreSee Less

Summer activities will be here before we know it and Zone Institute will be right on summer’s heels. Don’t miss out on any of the fellowship, fabulous keynotes and fun. Register today at https://d5020.com/ZI24 Registration prices go up on July 9th. #RotaryZones2627 #BigWestBigIdeas #BigWestRotary #ZoneInstitute #RotaryInternational #PeopleofAction #Spokane

As the crow flies, Spokane is the largest city for 1,656 miles! Spokane is also a hub for healthcare and has the largest concentration of hospitals, labs, clinics, health education, and research in the Inland Northwest and Northern Idaho. Learn more about this hidden gem in the Pacific Northwest when you join us in Spokane September 11-14. Register now at zoneintitute.org #rotaryzones2627 #bigwestbigideas #bigwestrotary #ZoneInstitute #rotaryinternational #PeopleOfAction #spokane #SpokaneTrivia ... See MoreSee Less

As the crow flies, Spokane is the largest city for 1,656 miles! Spokane is also a hub for healthcare and has the largest concentration of hospitals, labs, clinics, health education, and research in the Inland Northwest and Northern Idaho. Learn more about this hidden gem in the Pacific Northwest when you join us in Spokane September 11-14. Register now at zoneintitute.org #RotaryZones2627 #BigWestBigIdeas #BigWestRotary #ZoneInstitute #RotaryInternational #PeopleofAction #Spokane #SpokaneTrivia

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Excited to return to my birth town! Xo

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